Rush Intermediate Wheatgrass

$3.45
  • Superior seedling emergence and vigor to other cultivars
  • Superior forage production
  • Establishes easily
  • Highly palatable to livestock and wildlife

Other varieties: Oahu Intermediate Wheatgrass

Plant & Variety Documents

Quantity is per pound. Example: 1 = 1 lb, 2 = 2 lbs, 3 = 3lbs, etc. This is pure seed, not a live plant.


SKU RUSH Category


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Description

The University of Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station released ‘Rush’ intermediate wheatgrass in 1994. It has superior seedling emergence and vigor compared to other cultivars. Rush is an introduced, long-lived, cool season grass that grows up to 3 or 4 feet tall. Intermediate wheatgrass is native to Eurasia and has been cultivated there and in the United States for many years. Rush was compared with seven released cultivars of intermediate wheatgrass and other cool season grasses at sites throughout the western United States. It was selected for superior seedling emergence and vigor. Rush has equal to or superior forage production compared to other intermediate wheatgrass releases.

Rush Intermediate Wheatgrass Adaptation and Uses

This cultivar is adapted to the Northwest and Intermountain West regions of the United States. Wherever annual precipitation is 12 inches or more Rush can be establish. Rush may be adapted to the mountains of the Southwest, the Western and Northern Great Plains and the Southern Canadian Plains. Rush is well adapted to moderately deep, loamy soils but also grows on sandy and clayey soils.

In zones with 12 – 20 inches of precipitation Rush intermediate wheatgrass is used for erosion control, forage and cover. It is often used for rangeland and pasture stands. Because of its ability to establish quickly it competes well with aggressive annuals like cheatgrass. Where fast germinating perennials are needed Rush is used for critical area stabilization. It is often used in irrigated pasture mixes to provide feed and cover.

Establishment and Management

Seeding rate (drilled): 5 pound/acre

For critical area stabilization double the seeding rate. If used as a component of a mix, adjust seeding rate to percent of mix desired.

Seeding depth: seeded with a drill at a depth of ½ inch or less on medium to fine textured soils and no more than 1 inch deep on coarse textured soils.

Dryland seeding: Early spring on heavy to medium textured soils and in late fall (dormant) on medium to light textured soils. (minimum 14 inches annual precipitation required for sustainable seed production)

Irrigated seeding: lands should be seeded in spring and late summer. Late summer (August – mid September) seedings are not recommended unless irrigation is available.

Rush establishes quickly and seedling vigor is excellent. It makes good spring growth, fair summer growth, and good fall growth, if moisture is available. Light, frequent irrigation is beneficial for stand establishment. New seedings should be protected until fully established and the plants are able to withstand pulling by grazing animals without being uprooted. It is beneficial to cut at least one hay crop prior to grazing. Stands may require weed control measures during establishment. Application of herbicides should not be made until plants have reached the four to five leaf stage. Mowing the stand when weeds are beginning to bloom will reduce weed seed development. Grasshoppers and other insects may also damage new stands and pesticides may be needed for control.

Rush Intermediate Wheatgrass is highly palatable to livestock and wildlife. Livestock and wildlife will graze it throughout the growing season, but it is most preferred as forage in spring, early summer, and fall. A healthy, productive stand will not withstand heavy continuous grazing. Before grazing, eight inches of new growth should be attained. A four inch stubble height should be maintained following grazing or mowing and going into winter. On irrigated stands apply fertilizer as needed to maintain vigorous growth. A balance of nitrogen and phosphate fertilizer needs to be considered in order to maintain a legume component in a mixture. A soil test is recommended. Care should be taken to avoid excessive tillage because stands may be damaged.

 

Other varieties: Oahu Intermediate Wheatgrass

Additional information
Weight1 lbs