Irrigated Pasture Seed Mix

$3.81

Our top-selling livestock pasture mix. Performs best with sprinkler irrigation and survives 16-18′′ annual precipitation without irrigation.

  • Mid-Maturing Forage Orchardgrass
  • Late-Maturing Forage Orchardgrass
  • Tall Fescue, Forage Type
  • Meadow Bromegrass
  • Perennial Ryegrass
  • Minimum order quantity of 10 lbs.

Quantity is per pound. Example: 1 = 1 lb, 2 = 2 lbs, 3 = 3lbs, etc. This is pure seed, not a live plant.



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Map of Irrigated Pasture Mix Distribution Area
Irrigated Pasture Mix Distribution Area

Min. to Max. Annual Precipitation

48in.

Average Max. Height

Irrigated pasture grass is planted as a stand alone crop for pasture or hay. It can be used to oversee old pasture or thinning hay stands. Useful in pivot corners or isolated sections that need coverage and forage yield. Very effective at driving out weeds. Performs best under sprinkler irrigation, but can be flood irrigated once the seedlings have matured. Livestock can be turned in for pasture or it can be cut for hay. Features both mid and late-maturing varieties.

Our Irrigated Pasture Seed Mix is used by farmers, ranchers, ranchette owners and livestock owners from all walks of life. It is a top selling item at Great Basin Seed. Irrigated pasture grass is planted as a stand alone crop for pasture or hay or in pivot corners or isolated sections that need coverage and forage yield. Among other uses, it is very effective at driving out weeds.

Irrigated Pasture Seed Mix Performance:

Irrigated Pasture Seed Mix performs best under sprinkler irrigation, but it can be flood irrigated once the seedlings have matured. It will survive on a minimum of 16″ annual rainfall if no irrigation is present. Livestock can be turned in for pasture or it can be cut for hay. For arid situations consider out Dryland Pasture Mix.

Our Irrigated Pasture Mix features both mid and late-maturing Orchardgrass varieties. Both are performance-driven forage production varieties. This allows for summer cutting AND fall pasture.

Irrigated Pasture Seed Sowing Recommendations:

If your seeding is kept wet, especially during germination and establishment stages, Irrigated Pasture Mix can be sown any time of year. If you are supplementing annual precipitation and your water is scarce or comes at specific times of year, the best planting time is late fall (September-October). Seed will lay dormant until spring in late fall planting scenarios.

Best irrigated pasture grass results are obtained when drilled, but broadcasting is the most common method of planting. The soil is best prepared with some sort of light disturbance such as a harrow. Preparation will vary from sit to site and will depend upon your equipment. Correct planting depth is crucial to success. Planting too deep will likely result in failure – Plant no deeper than 1/4″

Planting Rate:
16 lbs./acre drilled (1/4″ deep)
20 lbs./acre broadcast (1/4″ deep)

  • Mid-Maturing Forage Orchardgrass
  • Late-Maturing Forage Orchardgrass
  • Tall Fescue, Forage Type
  • Meadow Bromegrass
  • Perennial Ryegrass

Our Irrigated Pasture Seed Mix has been a best seller for over 30 years and it is still going strong. It is our #1 best selling item year after year. We attribute it’s success to our insistence on only the finest varieties selected for performance.

Our irrigated pasture mix comes standard in our signature Old Tyme cloth bags!


Custom Mixing Options: We can modify any of our mixes to your liking. Give us a call if you have a custom application that you feel requires a special recipe. 435-283-1411

The graphic above should provide a good visual reference of proper seeding depth. Note: The roll/pack step is highly recommended (but not necessary) with the broadcast seeding method. We do NOT recommend you roll/pack after drilling unless you are absolutely certain your drill is set to the shallowest possible drill depth – no more than .25″. A drill depth set too deep will result in buried seeds, poor germination and poor establishment – or failure.

Left: Ideal soil prep and proper broadcast method seed depth. The seeds have good soil contact on an even seed bed.

Right: Large dirt clods result in poor soil contact and uneven establishment. To the best of your ability, prepare an even, disturbed seed bed. What is “correct” or “ideal” will vary with your circumstances. In a range situations or on rocky ground the soil in the left photo is unrealistic.

Pasture mixes &Correct Sowing Methods


Correct sowing method is crucial for the establishment of healthy pasture. Few things have so direct an effect on success – or failure. The following methods are recommended:

Broadcast + Roll (BEST): Broadcast seed on a prepared seed bed. In small plots this is easy done by hand. For medium plots, a fertilizer broadcaster works well. In large-scale seedings a tractor/truck/SUV mounter fertilizer spreader works well. After broadcasting, walking on the area works in small areas and accomplishes the same goal as a roller. In med-large scale seedings, compact the soil surface with a push-roller or a roller mounted to a vehicle or tractor. The goal of the roller is to “press” the seed into the soil surface, ensuring the best possible soil contact.

Broadcast (GOOD): Broadcast seed on a prepared seed bed. In small plots this is easy done by hand. For medium plots, a fertilizer broadcaster works well. In large-scale seedings a tractor/truck/SUV mounter fertilizer spreader works well. DO NOT attempt to bury the seed after broadcasting.

Drilling (GOOD, BUT MUST BE DONE CORRECTLY): There are countless brands and styles of drills. Each are set to their specific make and model – there is no “universal” setting. Set your drill to the desired seeding rate and lift disks to barely scratch the surface. DO NOT bury the seeds. One of the leading causes of establishment failure is sowing too deep.